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Feb 13, 2015

04:24:35 GMT--Biological Hazard - Australia - Australia



EDIS Number: BH-20150213-46983-AUS

Date / time: 13/02/2015 04:22:17 [UTC]

Event: Biological Hazard

Area: Australia

Country: Australia

State/County: State of New South Wales

Location: Illawarra

Number of Deads: 1 person(s)

Number of Injured: N/A

Number of Infected: 23 person(s)

Number of Missing: N/A

Number of Affected: N/A

Number of Evacuated: N/A

Damage level: N/A



Description:



In the timely public reporting that characterizes Australia, a person has died from Salmonella at an aged care facility in the Illawarra. NSW Health says cases of Salmonella first appeared in aged care homes on January 21. An investigation has uncovered 23 cases in 10 facilities across South Eastern Sydney, the Illawarra and ACT. Nine cases resulted in hospitalization and one death occurred after hospitalization. The Illawarra Retirement Trust says 20 of the cases occurred in it’s care centres. The IRT also runs a food distribution network for retirement homes. Director of the Communicable Diseases Branch of NSW Health, Vicky Sheppeard said, “Facilities are no longer serving foods considered as likely risks, for example food that is not reheated prior to serving.” No mention of temperatures that would be considered safe. Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District public health director Curtis Gregory said the elderly residents were mainly suffering from vomiting and diarrhea, but there were also problems from lack of hydration and some residents had high fevers. Salmonellosis is one of the most common notifiable conditions in NSW, with more than 3000 people diagnosed each year and many going undiagnosed. The bacteria is mainly spread to people when they eat undercooked food made from infected animals �" including meat, poultry, eggs and their by-products �" or salad items fertilised by manure. “It’s a fairly uncommon type of salmonella called bovismorbificans and we think it is linked to salad products,” Mr Gregory said. “Specifically we believe it may be due to the fertiliser or cow manure used to grow those salad products.”




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