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Apr 27, 2015

14:09:30 GMT--HAZMAT - North-America - USA


EDIS Number: HZ-20150427-47965-USA
Date / time: 27/04/2015 14:08:01 [UTC]
Event: HAZMAT
Area: North-America
Country: USA
State/County: State of Alabama
Location: [Mobile County]
Number of Deads: N/A
Number of Injured: N/A
Number of Infected: N/A
Number of Missing: N/A
Number of Affected: N/A
Number of Evacuated: N/A
Damage level: N/A

Description:

Mobile County [Alabama] Health Department Officials say since 1 Apr 2015, at least 200 people have been treated in Mobile County emergency rooms for serious health complications related to synthetic drugs typically identified with the street name "spice." The Mobile County Health Department has been made aware of the high numbers in recent days from hospital officials, following an announcement by the Alabama Department of Public Health of an upsurge in the number of patients reporting to emergency rooms statewide from drug overdoses linked to products containing poison known as spice and a host of other names. "The public must understand the overwhelming danger associated with spice and other poisonous substances like it," said Dr Bernard Eichold, Health Officer for Mobile County. "It's causing people to become seriously ill, including creating potential kidney damage in some. Because of the risk to public health, Eichold said the Mobile County Health Department (MCHD) is considering civil litigation against stores and their owners who sell such products: "We fully support local law enforcement and federal agency efforts to prosecute those who possess and sell this product." Last year, MCHD staff tracked spice-related emergency room [ER] visits. Between 11 Apr and 23 Apr 2014, Mobile hospitals reported 52 drug-related ER visits. One ER visit resulted in the death of a 60-year-old man who had taken spice, health officials said. Also last year, a snapshot of drug-related ER visits taken between 1 May and 13 May [2014], showed that 44 people were treated at Mobile hospitals for issues related to illicit drugs. The ages of the patients ranged from 14 to 58 in May [2014], according to information provided by area hospitals.

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